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Travel restrictions to Canada remain in place for September long weekend

(8/31/2020)

Fort Frances, ON, CA - The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is reminding all travellers ahead of the upcoming Labour Day long weekend that travel restrictions are still in place at all Canadian international border crossings.

 

The Government of Canada remains committed to protecting the health and safety of Canadians and reducing the spread of COVID-19 in Canada. 

 

All travel of an optional or discretionary nature, including tourism, recreation and entertainment, is covered by these measures across all ports of entry in all modes of transportation – land, marine, air and rail.

 

With the travel restrictions still in place, foreign nationals, including United States (U.S.) citizens, will not be allowed to enter Canada for any of the following examples of discretionary/optional travel:

·         opening or checking on a cottage or seasonal home

·         sightseeing and hiking

·         boating across the border

·         fishing or hunting

·         visiting friends or partners (outside of spouses or common-law)

·         attending a party or celebration

 

Asymptomatic immediate family members, spouses or common-law partners of Canadian citizens and permanent residents who meet the immediate family member definition and are coming to Canada for a minimum of 15 days will be exempt from the prohibition from entering Canada for a discretionary/optional purpose. Read more about foreign nationals who are immediate family members of Canadian citizens and permanent residents.

 

Unless exempt, boaters cannot enter Canadian waters (territorial sea and internal waters) or boundary waters for discretionary or optional reasons. These reasons include: touring, sightseeing and pleasure fishing. Read more Information for foreign boaters.

 

Foreign nationals may be permitted to transit through Canada to Alaska for a non-discretionary/non-optional reason, but must follow stricter rules and meet additional entry conditions. Read more about requirements for transiting through to Alaska.